Category Archives: word of the day

word of the day :: quackery

quackery [kwak–uh-ree] -noun, plural er·ies 1. the practice or methods of a quack. 2. an instance of this. Origin 1700-10; quack2  + -ery “But what is quackery? It is commonly an attempt to cure the diseases of a man by addressing his body … Continue reading

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word of the day :: dullard

dullard [duhl-erd] -noun a stupid, insensitive person. Origin 1400-50; late Middle English; see dull, -ard “Reflected from my golden eye The dullard knows that he is mad Tell me if I am not glad!” ~ T. S. Eliot ~ British poet, critic

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word of the day :: hubris

hubris [hyoo-bris, hoo-] -noun excessive pride or self-confidence; arrogance. Origin 1880-85; < Greek hýbris insolence “As both capitalist and communist states—not to mention the technological world—have evolved under the illusion that men purposefully built them, ideological optimism seeps into every … Continue reading

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word of the day :: salutary

salutary [sal-yuh-ter-ee] -adjective  1. favorable or promoting health; healthful. 2. promoting or conducive to some beneficial purpose; wholesome. Origin 1480-90; < Latin salūt ( āris ) ( salūt–  (stem of salūs ) health +-āris -ar1 ) + -ary “The plays and sports of children as as salutary to them as labor and work are … Continue reading

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word of the day :: gad

gad [gad] -verb (used without object) 1. to move restlessly or aimlessly from one place to another: to gad about. -noun 2. the act of gadding. Origin 1425-75; late Middle English gadden, perhaps back formation from gadeling companion in arms, … Continue reading

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word of the day :: abject

abject [ab-jekt, ab-jekt] -adjective 1. utterly hopeless, miserable, humiliating, or wretched: abject poverty. 2. contemptible; despicable; base-spirited: an abject coward. 3. shamelessly servile; slavish. 4. Obsolete . cast aside. Origin 1400-50; late Middle English < Latin abjectus thrown down (past … Continue reading

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word of the day :: poetaster

poetaster [poh-it-as-ter] -noun an inferior poet; a writer of indifferent verse. Origin 1590-1600; < Medieval Latin or Neo-Latin; see poet, –aster1 “‘Tis the common disease of all your musicians that they know no mean, to be entreated, either to begin … Continue reading

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word of the day :: irascible

irascible [ih-ras–uh-buh l] -adjective 1. easily provoked to anger; very irritable: an irascible old man. 2. characterized or produced by anger: an irascible response. Origin 1350-1400; Middle English irascibel < Late Latin  īrāscibilis, equivalent to Latin īrāsc– (stem of īrāscī to grow … Continue reading

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word of the day :: pelf

pelf [pɛlf] -noun derogatory money or wealth, esp if dishonestly acquired; lucre [C14: from Old French pelfre  booty; related to Latin pilāre  todespoil] Origin late 14c., from Anglo-Fr. pelf, from O.Fr. pelfre “booty, spoils” (11c.) , of unknown origin, related to pilfer (q.v.). Meaning “money, riches,” with a pejorative overtone first recorded c.1500. … Continue reading

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word of the day :: pernicious

pernicious [per-nish–uh s] -adjective  1. causing insidious harm or ruin; ruinous; injurious; hurtful: pernicious teachings; a pernicious lie. 2. deadly; fatal: a pernicious disease. 3. Obsolete . evil; wicked. Origin 1515-25; < Latin perniciōsus ruinous, equivalent to pernici ( es … Continue reading

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